The Study of Histological Effects of Solder Fumes in Rat Lungs

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Cell andMilecular research center,, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

2 Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

3 Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

4 Imam Ali Hospital, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran

Abstract

Objective(s)
To determine the potential toxic effects of manual soldering flux cored solder wire on lung of the rat as an experimental model.
Materials and Methods
A total number of 48 adult male rats were divided into experimental (n= 30) and control (n= 18) groups. Based on exposure time to solder fume, each group was further subdivided into 2, 4 and 6 week subgroups. Rats of experimental groups were exposed to fume in exposure chamber for 1 hour/day (Research Center of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, 12 Apr 2005 to 14 May 2005). The amount of fumes were measured daily by standard methods. At the end of experiment, lung specimens were collected from each experimental and control subgroups. Tissue samples were processed routinely and thickness of epithelium in bronchioles and interalveolar septas were measured in stained microscopic slides. Obtained data were analyzed by SPSS.
Results
Statistical analysis of data for thickness of epithelium in bronchioles showed that there was only a significant difference between 4 week experimental and control subgroups (P< 0.001). Analysis of data for thickness of interalveolar septa showed statistically significant differences between experimental and control subgroups of 4 and 6 weeks (P< 0.001). Histological examination was also revealed an inflammatory process in bronchioles and disorganized architecture in alveoli of lung in experimental subgroups.
Conclusion
The result showed that solder fume can change the normal architectures of epithelium in bronchioles and alveoli of the lung and it seems that the severities of changes were dependent on the exposure time.

Keywords


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