Difference in transient ischemia-induced neuronal damage and glucose transporter-1 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between adult and young gerbils

Document Type: Original Article

Authors

1 Department of Emergency Medicine, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, South Korea

2 Department of Emergency Medicine, Sacred Heart Hospital, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Anyang431-796, South Korea

3 Department of Neurobiology, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, South Korea

4 Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, Hallym University, Chuncheon 200-702, South Korea

5 Department of Biomedical Science, Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Hallym University, Chuncheon 200-702, South Korea

6 Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701, South Korea

Abstract

Objective(s): The alteration of glucose transporters is closely related with the pathogenesis of brain edema. We compared neuronal damage/death in the hippocampus between adult and young gerbils following transient cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and changes of glucose transporter-1(GLUT-1)-immunoreactive microvessels in their ischemic hippocampal CA1 region.
Materials and Methods: Transient cerebral ischemia was developed by 5-min occlusion of both common carotid arteries. Neuronal damage was examined by cresyl violet staining, NeuN immunohistochemistry and Fluoro-Jade B histofluorescence staining and changes in GLUT-1 expression was carried out by immunohistochemistry.
Results: About 90% of pyramidal neurons only in the adult CA1 region were damaged after ischemia/reperfusion; in the young, about 53 % of pyramidal neurons were damaged from 7 days after ischemia/reperfusion. The density of GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels was significantly higher in the young sham-group than that in the adult sham-group. In the ischemia-operated-groups, the density of GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels was significantly decreased in the adult and young at 1 and 4 days post-ischemia, respectively, thereafter, the density of GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels was gradually increased in both groups after ischemia/reperfusion.
Conclusion: CA1 pyramidal neurons of the young gerbil were damaged much later than that in the adult and that GLUT-1-immunoreactive microvessels were significantly decreased later in the young. These data indicate that GLUT-1 might differently contribute to neuronal damage according to age after ischemic insults.

Keywords


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